Past Champions

Men's TeamWomen's TeamMen's IndividualWomen's IndividualDoubles
Potter Cup (A Division/National Championship)

 

NATIONAL TEAM CHAMPIONS/POTTER CUP WINNERS (COACH):

2018: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
2017: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
2016: Yale University (David Talbott)
2015: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
2014: Havard University (Mike Way)
2013: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
2012: Princeton University (Bob Callahan)
2011: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
2010: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
2009: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
2008: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
2007: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
2006: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
2005: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
2004: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
2003: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
2002: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
2001: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
2000: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
1999: Trinity College (Paul Assaiante)
1998: Harvard University (Bill Doyle)
1997: Harvard University (Bill Doyle)
1996: Harvard University (Bill Doyle)
1995: Harvard University (Bill Doyle)
1994: Harvard University (Bill Doyle)
1993: Princeton University (Bob Callahan)
1992: Harvard University (Steve Piltch)
1991: Harvard University (Steve Piltch)
1990: Yale University (David Talbott)
1989: Yale University (David Talbott)
1988: Harvard University (Dave Fish)
1987: Harvard University (Dave Fish)
1986: Harvard University (Dave Fish)
1985: Harvard University (Dave Fish)
1984: Harvard University (Dave Fish)
1983: Harvard University (Dave Fish)
1982: Princeton University (Bob Callahan)
1981: Princeton University (Norm Peck)
1980: Harvard University (Dave Fish)
1979: Princeton University (Norm Peck)
1978: Princeton University (David Benjamin)
1977: Princeton University (David Benjamin)
1976: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1975: Princeton University (David Benjamin)
1974: Princeton University (Bill Summers)
1973: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1972: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1971: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1970: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1969: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1968: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1967: United States Naval Academy (Art Potter)
1966: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1965: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1964: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1963: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1962: Yale University (John Skillman)
1961: Yale University (John Skillman)
1960: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1959: United States Naval Academy (Art Potter)
1958: Yale University (John Skillman)
1957: United States Naval Academy (Art Potter)
1956: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1955: Princeton University (John Conroy)
1954: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1953: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby) and Yale University (John Skillman)
1952: Yale University (John Skillman)
1951: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1950: Yale University (John Skillman)
1949: Yale University (John Skillman)
1948: Yale University (John Skillman)
1947: Yale University (John Skillman)
1943: Yale University (John Skillman)
1942: Princeton University (John Conroy)

The top eight teams in the nation compete in the “A” division of the men’s National Team Championships for the national title and the Potter Cup. The Potter Cup is named for Art Potter, the United States Naval Academy’s longtime coach. Potter, who started coaching at Navy in 1950, coached the midshipmen to national team titles in 1957, 1959, and 1967. Until Trinity  won its first title in 1998, Navy was the only non-Ivy League school to win a national nine-player team championship. Potter was inducted into the College Squash Hall of Fame in 1990.

The records below list the national nine-player team champions. From 1942 to 1988, the title was based on dual-match records, with the team with the best record becoming the national champion. Since 1989, the title has been based on performance in the National Team Championships, with the team winning the “A” division becoming the national champion.

Hoehn Cup (B Division)

In the men’s National Team Championships, teams ranked ninth through sixteenth compete for the Hoehn Cup in the “B” division.

HOEHN CUP WINNERS (COACH):

2018: George Washington University (Wendy Lawrence)
2017: Dartmouth College (Hansi Wiens)
2016: Drexel University (John White)
2015: Princeton University (Sean Wilkinson)
2014: Princeton University (Sean Wilkinson)
2013: University of Western Ontario (Dave Morrish)
2012: University of Pennsylvania (Jack Wyant)
2011: University of Western Ontario (Jack Fairs)
2010: University of Pennsylvania (Craig Thorpe-Clark)
2009: University of Western Ontario (Jack Fairs)
2008: Bates College (Marc Kannegieser)
2007: Cornell University (Mark Devoy)
2006: Cornell University (Mark Devoy)
2005: Brown University (Stuart le Gassick)
2004: Williams College (Zafi Levy)
2003: Brown University (Stuart le Gassick)
2002: Denison University* (Jon Bridge)
2001: Dartmouth College (John Power)
2000: Brown University (Stuart le Gassick)
1999: Brown University (Stuart le Gassick)
1998: Dartmouth College (Chris Schutz Brownell)
1997: University of Pennsylvania (Jim Masland)
1996: Franklin & Marshall College (John Stallings)
1995: Franklin & Marshall College (John Stallings)
1994: Amherst College (Peter Robson)
1993: Cornell University (Bill Austin)
1992: Amherst College (Peter Robson)
1991: Franklin & Marshall College (John Stallings)
1990: Trinity College (Richard Danforth)
1989: Williams College (Dave Johnson)

*Club Program

The Hoehn Cup is named for Edward “Red” Hoehn.  Hoehn was hired to coach Dartmouth’s men’s team in 1938  and guided the Big Green for 25 years. A top amateur player in the 1930s, Hoehn often would play matches against his players as part of their training. He served as the President of the Intercollegiate Squash Coaches Association while at Dartmouth, and he was inducted into the Men’s College Squash Hall of Fame in 1990.

Summers Cup (C Division)

In the men’s National Team Championships, teams ranked seventeenth to twenty-fourth compete for the Summers Cup in the “C” division.

SUMMERS CUP WINNERS (COACH):

2017: Middlebury College (Mark Lewis)
2016: Bates College (Pat Cosquer)
2015: Middlebury College (Mike Morgan)
2014: Middlebury College (John Illig)
2013: Middlebury College (John Illig)
2012: George Washington University (Wendy Lawrence)
2011: Bowdoin Colleg (Tomas Fortson)
2010: Middlebury College (John Illig)
2009: Middlebury College (John Illig)
2008: Saint Lawrence University (Chris Abplanalp)
2007: Saint Lawrence University (Chris Abplanalp)
2006: Denison University* (Peter Burling)
2005: Colby College (Sakhi Khan)
2004: Denison University* (Peter Burling)
2003: Franklin & Marshall College (John Stallings)
2002: Colby College (Sakhi Khan)
2001: Wesleyan University (Geoff Wheeler)
2000: Amherst College (Peter Robson)
1999: Cornell University
1998: Franklin & Marshall College (John Stallings)
1997: Wesleyan University (Sasha Cooke)
1996: Colby College (John Illig)
1995: Colby College (John Illig)
1994: Bowdoin College (Dan Hammond)
1993: Cal-Berkeley*
1992: Cal-Berkeley*
1991: Cal-Berkeley*
1990: Hobart College
1989: Fordham University (Bob Hawthorn)

* Club Program

The Summers Cup is named for Jack Summers. Summers, who was born in England, learned squash after he moved to Boston in 1911. During the 1920s he taught squash at the Union Boat Club, which he persuaded to allow women to play in 1925, setting the stage for the flourishing of women’s squash in Boston. He won the first United States Professionals tournament (now known as the Tournament of Champions) in 1930, successfully defending his title in 1931 and 1932 and reclaiming it in 1934. He became the first squash coach at MIT in 1930 and  guided the Engineers for the next 27 years. He was inducted into the Men’s College Squash Hall of Fame in 1990.

Conroy Cup (D Division)

In the men’s National Team Championships, teams ranked 25th to 32nd compete for the Conroy Cup in the “D” division.

CONROY CUP WINNERS (COACH):

2017: Wesleyan University (Shona Kerr)
2016: University of Western Ontario (Derek Moore)
2015: Hamilton College (Jamie King)
2014: Connecticut College (Barry Ward)
2013: Stanford University* (Mark Talbott)
2012: Hobart College (Tim Riskie)
2011: Connecticut College (Chris O’Brien)
2010: Connecticut College (Bill McNally)
2009: Connecticut College (Bill McNally)
2008: Colby College (Sakhi Khan)
2007: Hobart College (Carol Weymuller)
2006: University of Rochester (Martin Heath)
2005: University of Rochester (David Kay)
2004: Tufts University (Doug Eng)
2003: George Washington University (Simon Harrington)
2002: Haverford College (Sean Sloane)
2001: Stanford University*
2000: Haverford College (Sean Sloane)
1999: Tufts University (Doug Eng)
1998: Bates College (Paul Gastongua)
1997: University of Rochester (Peter Lyman)
1996: Hamilton College
1995: Fordham University (Bob Hawthorn)
1994: United States Military Academy at Westpoint (Army)
1993: Bowdoin College (Dan Hammond)
1992: Wesleyan University (Peter Kostacopoulos)
1991: Wesleyan University (Peter Kostacopoulos)
1990: Columbia University*
1989: Cal-Berkeley*

The Conroy Cup is named for John Conroy, who began coaching at Princeton in 1939. Over the next thirty years, Conroy guided the Tigers to two national team titles, including the very first team championship, which was awarded in 1942 and was based on dual-match records. He also coached multiple winners of the  individual intercollegiate championships. Conroy was inducted into the Men’s College Squash Hall of Fame in 1990.

* Club Program

Chaffee Cup (E Division)

In the men’s National Team Championships, teams in the “E” division compete for the Chaffee Cup.

CHAFFEE CUP WINNERS (COACH):

2017: Haverford College (Niki Clement)
2016: Tufts University (Joe McManus)
2015: Denison University* (Walt Thieman)
2014: Northeastern University*
2013: Boston College*
2012: Boston College*
2011: Vanderbilt University*
2010: Kenyon College* (John Knepper)
2009: Drexel University*
2008: University of Virginia*
2007: Colgate University*
2006: Northeastern University*
2005: Colgate University*
2004: Colgate University*
2003: University of Virginia*
2002: George Washington University*
2001: Northwestern University*
2000: Stanford University*
1999: Northwestern University*
1998: United States Military Academy at West Point
1997: Connecticut College
1996: Colgate University*
1995: Connecticut College
1994: Babson College*
1993: Columbia University*

* Club Program

The Chaffee Cup is named for Clarence C. Chaffee. Chaffee began Williams’s squash program in 1938, coached the school’s first intercollegiate team in 1939, and led the program until his retirement in 1970. Under Chaffee, Williams won the four-player team tournament in 1958, and his teams were often noted for their sportsmanship.  Chaffee, for whom the Women’s College Squash Association’s Chaffee Award is named, was inducted into the Men’s College Squash Hall of Fame in 1990.

Serues Cup (F Division)

In the men’s National Team Championships, teams in the “F” division compete for the Serues Cup.

SERUES CUP WINNERS (COACH):

2017: University of Richmond*
2016: Northeastern University*
2015: Boston College*
2014: Washington University in St. Louis*
2013: New York University* (Tony Maruca)
2012: Haverford College (Niki Clement)
2011: Bucknell University*
2010: Vanderbilt University*
2009: Kenyon College* (John Knepper)
2008: Georgetown University*

*Club Program

The Serues Cup is named for Edward Serues, who coached men’s squash at Amherst from 1957 to 1987. Serues developed a strong program at Amherst and also helped develop successful individual players, like Tom Poor, who reached the finals of the national intercollegiate individual tournament. Serues also coached tennis at Amherst and was an accomplished tennis player in his own right, competing — and winning — well into his seventies. But for Serues, coaching came first; in retirement in Florida, he gave up the winter tennis season to coach a local high school team. Not surprisingly, several of his squash players went on to become successful coaches, like Tom Rumpler, who received the Men’s College Sqaush Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2007. Serues himself received the Lifetime Achievement Award in 2002 and was inducted into the Men’s College Squash Hall of Fame in 1991.

Hawthorn Cup (G Division)

In the men’s National Team Championships, teams in the “G” division compete for the Hawthorn Cup.

HAWTHORN CUP WINNERS (COACH):

2017: Northwestern University*
2016: Colgate University*
2015: Swarthmore College*
2014: Bryant University* (John Wilson)
2013: College of Charleston*
2012: Boston University*
2011: Washington University in St. Louis*
2010: Lafayette University*
2009: Lafayette University*

The Hawthorn Cup is named for Robert Hawthorn. A standout squash and tennis player at Fordham, Hawthorn became the head squash coach in 1956, a position he has held for over fifty years. Under Hawthorn, who also coaches tennis, the Rams won the Summers Cup in 1989 and the Conroy Cup in 1995 at the National Team Championships. Hawthorn was the first recipient of the Men’s College Squash Lifetime Achievement Award, and he was inducted into the Men’s College Squash Hall of Fame in 2005.

* Club Program

H Division

The H division was established during the 2013 – 2014 season.

H DIVISION WINNER (COACH):

2017: University of Minnesota* (John Stever)
2016: Duke University*
2015: Vassar College (Jane Parker)
2014: University of Notre Dame* (Geoff McCuen)

*Club Program

Emerging Teams

In the men’s National Team Championships, the Emerging Team division was formed for 5-player teams that were newly formed.  Below are past winners of the Emerging Teams division:

EMERGING TEAMS WINNERS (COACH):

2012: University of Maryland*
2011: University of Maryland*
2010: Tulane University*
2009: University of Illinois*
2008: University of North Carolina*
2007: Georgetown University*
2006: University of Notre Dame*
2005: University of Washington* (Michael Bishop)

*Club Program

 

Six-Man Trophy

The National Intercollegiate Squash Racquets Association (NISRA), a precursor to the Men’s College Squash Association, first held a national individual tournament in 1932 and first awarded a national team title, based on dual-match records, in 1942. In 1956, they decided to add a team component to the individual tournament. Each school was allowed to enter up to four players in the tournament, and each player earned a point for every round they gained in the main and consolation draws. The team with the most points at the end won the team trophy. In 1969, the NISRA changed the format so that up to six players players from each team could compete. They added a third division to the tournament, and only two players per team were allowed in each division. The NISRA made another, more sweeping change in 1989, doing away with what had become known as the Six-Man Trophy altogether and creating separate team and individual tournaments held on different weekends, the format used today.

The records below list the winners of the team component of the national individual tournament. From 1956 to 1968, teams competed with four-player teams, and from 1969 to 1988 they competed with six-player teams.

SIX-MAN TEAM TROPHY:

1988: Princeton University
1987: Harvard University
1986: Harvard University
1985: Harvard University
1984: Harvard University
1983: Harvard University
1982: Harvard University
1981: Harvard University
1980: University of Western Ontario
1979: Princeton University
1978: Princeton University
1977: University of Western Ontario
1976: Princeton University
1975: Harvard University
1974: University of Pennsylvania
1973: University of Pennsylvania
1972: Harvard University
1971: University of Pennsylvania
1970: Harvard University
1969: Harvard University
1968: Harvard University
1967: Harvard University
1966: Harvard University
1965: Princeton University
1964: Harvard University
1963: Yale University
1962: Yale University
1961: Yale University
1960: Princeton University
1959: Princeton University
1958: Williams College
1957: Harvard University
1956: Harvard University

Howe Cup (A Division/National Championship)

 

HOWE CUP WINNER (COACH):

2018: Harvard University (Mike Way)
2017: Harvard University (Mike Way)
2016: Harvard University (Mike Way)
2015: Harvard University (Mike Way)
2014: Trinity College (Wendy Bartlett)
2013: Harvard University (Mike Way)
2012: Harvard University (Mike Way)
2011: Yale University (David Talbott)
2010: Harvard University (Satinder Bajwa)
2009: Princeton University (Gail Ramsay)
2008: Princeton University (Gail Ramsay)
2007: Princeton University (Gail Ramsay)
2006: Yale University (David Talbott)
2005: Yale University (David Talbott)
2004: Yale University (Mark Talbott)
2003: Trinity College (Wendy Bartlett)
2002: Trinity College (Wendy Bartlett)
2001: Harvard University (Satinder Bajwa)
2000: University of Pennsylvania (Demer Holleran)
1999: Princeton University (Gail Ramsay)
1998: Princeton University (Gail Ramsay)
1997: Harvard University (Bill Doyle)
1996: Harvard University (Bill Doyle)
1995: Harvard University (Bill Doyle)
1994: Harvard University (Bill Doyle)
1993: Harvard University (Bill Doyle)
1992: Yale University (Dale Walker)
1991: Princeton University (Betty Constable )
1990: Harvard University (Steve Piltch)
1989: Princeton University (Betty Constable)
1988: Harvard University (Steve Piltch)
1987: Harvard University (Steve Piltch)
1986: Yale University (Dale Walker)
1985: Harvard University (Pris Choate)
1984: Princeton University (Betty Constable)
1983: Princeton University (Betty Constable)
1982: Harvard University (Jack Barnaby)
1981: Princeton University (Betty Constable)
1980: Princeton University (Betty Constable)
1979: Princeton University (Betty Constable)
1978: Princeton University (Betty Constable)
1977: Yale University (Marion Freeman)
1976: Princeton University (Betty Constable)
1975: Princeton University (Betty Constable)
1974: Princeton University (Betty Constable)
1973: Princeton University (Betty Constable)

Before 1973, there was no national intercollegiate team tournament for women. The only real option for women’s college teams interested in participating in a national tournament was the Howe Cup, an inter-city tournament for women’s teams of all ages. That tournament was named in honor of three influential figures in the history of American women’s squash: Margaret Howe and her twin daughters, Peggy Howe White and Betty Howe Constable. Between them, the Howes won ten national women’s singles titles: Margaret in 1929, 1932, and 1934; Peggy in 1952 and 1953; and Betty in 1950 and from 1956 to 1959. But the Howe family also contributed to the sport as a whole, particularly Betty Howe Constable, who in 1971 became the first head coach of Princeton’s women’s squash team.

During the late 1960s and 1970s, several college teams participated in the inter-city Howe Cup, and by 1972 there were enough teams for a separate college division. College coaches at the tournament that year — among them Betty Howe Constable — decided that college teams needed a national championship of their own. The following year they held a separate national championship tournament for women’s college teams. Margaret Howe donated a hand-engraved silver bowl as the tournament’s permanent trophy, and Betty Howe Constable’s Princeton team won the first title. Not surprisingly, the women’s national intercollegiate team championships became known as the Howe Cup.

The Howe Cup grew as more schools started women’s teams, and it eventually expanded to multiple divisions. In 2001, the four main divisions were named in honor of other influential figures in women’s college squash: Aggie Kurtz (B division), Dale Walker (C division), and Patricia Epps (D division). The A division kept the name “Howe Cup,” and the team that wins the national title still gets to keep the trophy Margaret Howe donated until the next year’s team championships.

Kurtz Cup (B Division)

Women’s teams ranked ninth through sixteenth compete for the Kurtz Cup, a permanent trophy presented to the winners of the B division of the National Team Championships.

KURTZ CUP WINNER (COACH):

2017: Dartmouth College (Hansi Wiens)
2016: Dartmouth College (Hansi Wiens)
2015: Stanford University (Mark Talbott)
2014: George Washington University (Wendy Lawrence)
2013: Dartmouth College (Hansi Wiens)
2012: Brown University (Stuart leGassick)
2011: Brown University (Stuart leGassick)
2010: Dartmouth College (Hansi Wiens)
2009: Brown University (Stuart Legassick)
2008: Williams College (Zafi Levy)
2007: Cornell University (Julee Devoy)
2006: Bates College (John Illig)
2005: Bates College (John Illig)
2004: Bates College (John Illig)
2003: Bowdoin College (Tomas Fortson)
2002: University of Pennsylvania (James Martel)
2001: Williams College (Julie Greenwood)
2000: Bowdoin College (Sharon Bradley)
1999: Williams College (Julie Greenwood)
1998: Bowdoin College (Brian Callahan)

The Kurtz Cup is named for Aggie Bixler Kurtz. While working under Betty Richey at Vassar, Kurtz organized the first women’s national intercollegiate individual tournament, which was held at Wellesley in 1965. Kurtz went on to start a women’s squash team at Dartmouth in 1972 and was a long-time contributor to the development of the College Squash Association and one of its predecessors, the United States Women’s Intercollegiate Squash Racquets Association. Kurtz was inducted into the College Squash Hall of Fame in 1996 and the U.S. Squash Hall of Fame in 2005. She received the College Squash Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2000.

Walker Cup (C Division)

Women’s teams ranked seventeenth through twenty-fourth compete for the Walker Cup, a permanent trophy presented to the winners of the C division of the National Team Championships.

WALKER CUP WINNER (COACH):

2017: Amherst College (Peter Robson)
2016: Bates College (Pat Cosquer)
2015: Amherst College (Peter Robson)
2014: Amherst College (Peter Robson)
2013: Bowdoin College (Tomas Fortson)
2012: George Washington University (Wendy Lawrence)
2011: Franklin & Marshall (John White)
2010: George Washington University (Maura Myers)
2009: Amherst College (Thomas Carmean)
2008: Vassar College (Jane Parker)
2007: William Smith College (Chip Fishback)
2006: William Smith College (Chip Fishback)
2005: Middlebury College (Dave Saward)
2004: Middlebury College (Dave Saward)
2003: Mount Holyoke College (Katie Hawke)
2002: Vassar College (Jane Parker)
2001: Connecticut College
2000: Hamilton College
1999: Vassar College (Craig Thorpe-Clark)
1998: Wesleyan University (Patti Klecha-Porter)

The Walker Cup is named for Dale Walker. After working at squash clubs in Baltimore and Newport, Walker became the coach of Yale’s women’s team in 1981, leading the Bulldogs to national titles in 1986 and 1992. A long-time contributor to the development of the College Squash Association, Walker has continued to stay involved with college squash since her 1998 retirement from Yale through her work as a squash photographer. Walker was inducted into the College Squash Hall of Fame in 2000.

Epps Cup (D Division)

Women’s teams ranked 25th through 32nd compete for the Epps Cup, a permanent trophy presented to the winners of the D division of the National Team Championships.

EPPS CUP WINNER (COACH):

2017: Colby College (Sakhi Khan)
2016: Wesleyan University (Shona Kerr)
2015: Tufts University (Joe McManus)
2014: University of Virginia* (Mark Allen)
2013: William Smith (Chip Fishback)
2012: Smith College (Tim Bacon)
2011: Georgetown University*
2010: Columbia University (Kelsey Engman)
2009: William Smith College (Chip Fishback)
2008: University of Virginia*
2007: Saint Lawrence University (Chris Abplanalp)
2006: University of Virginia (Mary Whelan, captain)
2005: Mount Holyoke College  (Pam Saunders)
2004: Hamilton College (Jamie King)
2003: Franklin & Marshall College (Ronald Epps)
2002: Wesleyan University (David Cukierman)
2001: Wesleyan University (Patti Klecha-Porter)
2000: Vassar College (Jason Buhalis)
1999: Saint Lawrence University*
1998: Johns Hopkins University*

The Epps Cup is named for Patricia Epps. Epps began coaching women’s squash at Franklin & Marshall in 1978, and over the next 23 years she led the Diplomats to more than 200 wins. Epps served as the president of the Women’s College Squash Association for six years, and in 1999 she was honored with the College Squash Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Also a long-time women’s tennis coach, Epps became the first female athletics director in Franklin & Marshall’s history in 2007.

* Club Program

E Division

Women’s teams ranked 33rd through 40th compete for a permanent trophy presented to the winners of the E division of the National Team Championships.

E DIVISION WINNER (COACH):

2017: Georgetown University*
2016: Georgetown University*
2015: Dickinson College (Chris Sachvie)
2014: Haverford College (Niki Clement)
2013: Haverford College (Niki Clement)
2012: Colgate University (Graham Bassett)*
2011: University of California Berkeley (Lauren Patrizio)*
2010: Wellesley College (Wendy Berry)

*Club Program

F Division

The F division was established during the 2014 – 2015 season.

F DIVISION WINNER (COACH):

2015: Boston University*

* Club Program

Emerging Teams

In the women’s National Team Championships, the Emerging Teams division was  is for newly formed teams.  Below are past winners of the Emerging Teams division:

EMERGING TEAMS WINNERS:

2013: Vanderbilt University*
2012: New York University* (Tony Maruca)
2011: New York University* (Maura Myers)
2010: Vanderbilt University*
2009: University of Vermont*
2008: Georgetown University*

* Club Program

 

Pool Trophy (A Divison/Individual National Champion)

 

INDIVIDUAL CHAMPIONS – POOL TROPHY (SCHOOL):

2018, at Squash On Fire/GWU: Champion – David Ryan (Harvard University); Finalist – Kush Kumar (Trinity College)
2017, at Dartmouth College: Champion – Osama Khalifa (Columbia University); Finalist – Mario Yanez (University of Rochester)
2016, at Chelsea Piers (CT): Champion – Ahmed Abdel Khalek (Bates College); Finalist – Ryosei Kobayashi (University of Rochester)
2015, at Princeton University: Champion – Ahmed Abdel Khalek (Bates College); Finalist – Osama Khalifa (Columbia University)
2014, at Drexel/Penn: Champion – Ali Farag (Harvard University); Finalist – Amr Khaled Khalifa (St. Lawrence University)
2013, at Trinity: Champion – Amr Khaled Khalifa (St. Lawrence University); Finalist – Todd Harrity (Princeton University)
2012, at Amherst: Champion – Ali Farag (Harvard University); Finalist – Ramit Tandon (Columbia University)
2011, at Dartmouth: Champion – Todd Harrity (Princeton University); Finalist – Nick Sachvie (Cornell University)
2010, at Trinity: Champion – Colin West (Harvard University); Finalist – Todd Harrity (Princeton University)
2009, at Williams: Champion – Baset Chaudhry (Trinity College); Finalist – Mauricio Sanchez (Princeton University)
2008, at Navy: Champion – Baset Chaudhry (Trinity College)
2007, at Penn: Champion – Siddharth Suchde (Harvard University); Finalist – Mauricio Sanchez (Princeton University)
2006, at Amherst: Champion – Yasser El-Halaby (Princeton University); Finalist – Siddharth Suchde (Harvard University)
2005, at Dartmouth: Champion – Yasser El-Halaby (Princeton University)
2004: Champion – Yasser El-Halaby (Princeton University); Finalist – William Broadbent (Harvard University)
2003: Champion – Yasser El-Halaby (Princeton University)
2002: Champion – Bernardo Samper (Trinity College)
2001: Champion – David Yik (Princeton University)
2000: Champion – Peter Yik (Princeton University); Finalist – Marcus Cowie (Trinity College)
1999: Champion – Peter Yik (Princeton University); Finalist – Tim Wyant (Harvard University)
1998: Champion – Marcus Cowie (Trinity College); Finalist – Daniel Ezra (Harvard University)
1997: Champion – Marcus Cowie (Trinity College); Finalist – Daniel Ezra (Harvard University)
1996: Champion – Daniel Ezra (Harvard University); Finalist – Joel Kirsch (Harvard University)
1995: Champion – Tal Ben-Shachar (Harvard University); Finalist – Dan Ezra (Harvard University)
1994: Champion – Adrian Ezra (Harvard University)
1993: Champion – Adrian Ezra (Harvard University)
1992: Champion – Jeremy Fraiberg (Harvard University)
1991: Champion – Adrian Ezra (Harvard University)
1990: Champion – Jon Bernheimer (Harvard University)
1989: Champion – Scott Dulmage (University of Westem Ontario)
1988: Champion – Jeff Stanley (Princeton University)
1987: Champion – Jeff Stanley (Princeton University)
1986: Champion – Kenton Jernigan (Harvard University)
1985: Champion – Paul Deratney (University of Toronto)
1984: Champion – Kenton Jernigan (Harvard University)
1983: Champion – Kenton Jernigan (Harvard University)
1982: Champion – Victor Wagner (Yale University)
1981: Champion – John Nimick (Princeton University); Finalist – Brad Desaulniers (Harvard University)
1980: Champion – Mike Desaulniers (Harvard University)
1979: Champion – Ned Edwards (University of Pennsylvania)
1978: Champion – Mike Desaulniers (Harvard University)
1977: Champion – Mike Desaulniers (Harvard University)
1976: Champion – Phil Mohtadi (University of Western Ontario)
1975: Champion – Juan de Villafranca (Iberoamericana)
1974: Champion – Juan de Villafranca (Iberoamericana); Finalist – Glen Whitman (Harvard University)
1973: Champion – Peter Briggs (Harvard University); Finalist – Andrew Wiegand (Harvard University)
1972: Champion – Peter Briggs (Harvard University)
1971: Champion – Palmer Page (University of Pennsylvania)
1970: Champion – Lawrence Terrell (Harvard University)
1969: Champion – Anil Nayar (Harvard University); Finalist – Lawrence Terrell (Harvard University)
1968: Champion – Anil Nayar (Harvard University); Finalist – Lawrence Terrell (Harvard University)
1967: Champion – Anil Nayar (Harvard University)
1966: Champion – Howard Coonley (University of Pennsylvania); Finalist Richard Sterne (Harvard University)
1965: Champion – Walter Oehrlein (United States Military Academy at West Point)
1964: Champion – Victor Niederhoffer (Harvard University)
1963: Champion – Ralph Howe (Yale University)
1962: Champion – Ralph Howe (Yale University)
1961: Champion – Stephen Vehslage (Princeton University)
1960: Champion – Stephen Vehslage (Princeton University)
1959: Champion – Stephen Vehslage(Princeton University)
1958: Champion – J. Smith Chapman (Sir George Williams); Finalist – Lawrence Sears (Harvard University)
1957: Champion – Ben Heckscher (Harvard University)
1956: Champion – Ben Heckscher (Harvard University)
1955: Champion – Roger Campbell (Princeton University)
1954: Champion – Roger Campbell (Princeton University)
1953: Champion – Charles Ufford (Harvard University)
1952: Champion – Charles Ufford (Harvard University)
1951: Champion – Charles Foster (Harvard University); Finalist – Charles Ufford (Harvard University)
1950: Champion – Harold Hands (Yale University)
1949: Champion – Diehl Mateer (Haverford College)
1948: Champion – Diehl Mateer (Haverford College)
1947: Champion – Peter Landry (McGill University)
1946: Champion – Glenn Shively (Yale University)
1943: Champion – John Holt (Yale University)
1942: Champion – Charles Brinton (Princeton University)
1941: Champion – Charles Brinton (Princeton University)
1940: Champion – Kim Canavarro (Harvard University)
1939: Champion – Stanley W. Pearson (Princeton University); Finalist – Kim Canavarra (Harvard University
1938: Champion – Leroy M. Lewis (University of Pennsylvania)
1937: Champion – Richard M. Dorson (Harvard University)
1936: Champion – Germain G. Glidden (Harvard University)
1935: Champion – Germain G. Glidden (Harvard University)
1934: Champion – E. Rotan Sarent (Harvard University); Finalist – Germain G. Glidden (Harvard University)
1933: Champion – William Foulke (Princeton University)
1932: Champion – Beekman Pool (Harvard University)

Held at the end of the college squash season, the individual tournament features two divisions: an A division, in which the top 16 players in the nation compete for the Pool Trophy; and four B divisions, where players ranked 17th – 64th compete.

A men’s national intercollegiate individual tournament has been held since 1932. The year before it was first held, Metropolitan Squash Racquets Association president Ernest “Honey” Humpstone invited players from Harvard, MIT, Princeton, Trinity, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale to a tournament at the University Club. At a luncheon during the tournament, the players decided to form an intercollegiate squash association, which eventually became the College Squash Association. They also decided to hold an annual national individual championship, and Eugene Pool, a Harvard alum and a squash enthusiast, donated a permament trophy for the tournament. The following year Pool’s son Beekman,  who was the first president of the Intercollegiate Squash Racquets Association and went on to win two open national championships, won the first individual title. The top collegiate players in the nation still compete for the Pool Trophy.

Molloy Cup (B Division)

MOLLOY CUP (SCHOOL):

2017, at Dartmouth College: Spencer Lovejoy (Yale University); Moustafa Bayoumy (St. Lawrence University); Affeeq Ismail (Trinity College); and Tomotaka Endo (University of Rochester)
2016, at Chelsea Piers (CT): Kah Wah Cheong (Yale University); Lenard Puski (St. Lawrence University); Tomotaka Endo (University of Rochester); and Hayes Murphy (University of Pennsylvania)
2015, at Princeton University: Champion – Andrew McGuinness (United States Naval Academy); Finalist – Affeeq Ismail (Trinity College)
2014, at Drexel/Penn: Rishi Jalan (Cornell University); Finalist – Justin Singh (Drexel University)
2013, at Trinity: Vivek Dinodia (Princeton); Finalist – Blake Reinson (Brown University)
2012, at Amherst: Vrishab Kotian (Trinity College); Finalist – Omar Sobhy (George Washington University)
2011, at Dartmouth: Omar Sobhy (George Washington University); Finalist – Matt Domenick (University of Rochester)
2010, at Trinity: C.J. Plimpton (Yale University); Finalist – Jason Michas (Harvard University)
2009, at Williams: Chris Binnie (Trinity College); Finalist – Chris Hanebury (Western Ontario)
2008: Richard Hill (Harvard University)
2007: Nils Mattsson (United States Naval Academy)
2006: Simba Muhwati (Trinity College)
2005: Vincent Yu (Princeton University)
2004: Jacques Swanipoel (Trinity College)
2003: Gaurav Yadav (Harvard University)

The Molloy Cup is named for Albert Molloy, Jr., a pioneering coach at the University of Pennsylvania. A former Marine and two-time finalist at the US Professional Championships (now the Tournament of Champions), Molloy joined the Penn athletic department in 1959. Over the next 31 years, he guided the Quakers to a 215-101 record, winning three Ivy League titles along the way. Molloy, who also coached Penn’s tennis team, wrote several books about squash and made and marketed the first instructional film about the sport. He was inducted into the Men’s College Squash Hall of Fame in 1993, received the Lifetime Achievement Award in 2001, and was inducted into the U.S. Squash Hall of Fame in 2008. Beginning with the 2015 – 2016 season, players seeded 17th – 64th are divided into four draws that are evenly distributed by seeding.

Ramsay Cup (A Divison/Individual National Champion)

 

INDIVIDUAL CHAMPIONS – RAMSAY CUP (SCHOOL):

2018, at Squash On Fire/GWU: Champion – Reeham Sedky (University of Pennsylvania); Finalist – Georgina Kennedy (Harvard University)
2017, at Dartmouth College: Champion – Georgina Kennedy (Harvard University); Finalist – Reeham Sedky (University of Pennsylvania)
2016, at Chelsea Piers (CT): Champion – Kanzy El Defrawy (Trinity College); Finalist – Reeham Sedky (University of Pennsylvania)
2015, at Princeton University: Champion – Amanda Sobhy (Harvard University); Finalist – Kanzy El Defrawy (Trinity College)
2014, at Drexel University/University of Pennsylvania: Champion – Amanda Sobhy (Harvard University); Finalist – Kanzy El Defrawy (Trinity College)
2013, at Trinity College: Champion – Amanda Sobhy (Harvard University); Finalist – Kanzy El Defrawy (Trinity College)
2012, at Amherst College: Champion – Amanda Sobhy (Harvard University); Finalist – Millie Tomlinson (Yale University)
2011, at Dartmouth College: Champion – Millie Tomlinson (Yale University); Finalist – Laura Gemmell (Harvard University);
2010, at Trinity College: Champion – Laura Gemmell (Harvard University); Finalist – Pamela Hathway (Trinity College)
2009, at Williams College: Champion – Nour Bahgat (Trinity College); Finalist – Kristen Lange (University of Pennsylvania)
2008, at United States Naval Academy: Champion – Miranda Ranieri (Yale University); Finalist – Kristen Lange (University of Pennsylvania)
2007, at University of Pennsylvania: Champion – Kyla Grigg (Harvard University); Finalist – Kristen Lange (University of Pennsylvania)
2006, at Amherst College: Champion – Lily Lorentzen (Harvard University); Finalist – Kyla Grigg (Harvard University)
2005, at Dartmouth College: Champion – Michelle Quibell (Yale University); Finalist – Kyla Grigg (Harvard University)
2004, at St. Lawrence University: Champion – Michelle Quibell (Yale University); Finalist – Amina Helal (Trinity College)
2003, at Trinity College: Champion – Amina Helal (Trinity College); Finalist – Runa Reta (University of Pennsylvania)
2002, at Princeton University: Champion – Amina Helal (Trinity College); Finalist – Lynn Leong (Trinity College)
2001, at Harvard University: Champion – Julia Beaver (Princeton University); Finalist – Amina Helal (Trinity College)
2000, at Williams College: Champion – Julia Beaver (Princeton University); Finalist – Laura Keating (Yale University)
1999, University of Pennsylvania: Champion – Julia Beaver (Princeton University); Finalist – Devon Kennedy (Brown University)
1998, Amherst College: Champion – Ivy Pochoda (Harvard University); Finalist – Jessica DiMauro (University of Pennsylvania)
1997, Dartmouth College: Champion – Katherine Johnson (Princeton University); Finalist – Jessica DiMauro (University of Pennsylvania)
1996, Trinity College: Champion – Jessica DiMauro (University of Pennsylvania); Finalist – Ivy Pochoda (Harvard University)
1995, University of Pennsylvania: Champion – Libby Eynon (Harvard University); Finalist – Margo Green (Franklin & Marshall College)
1994, Williams College: Champion – Jordana Fraiberg (Harvard University); Finalist – Margo Green (Franklin & Marshall College)
1993, Trinity College: Champion – Vanya Desai (Harvard University); Finalist – Margo Green (Franklin & Marshall College)
1992, Princeton University: Champion – Jordana Fraiberg (Harvard University); Finalist – Berkeley Belknap (Yale University)
1991, Amherst College: Champion – Berkeley Belknap (Yale University); Finalist – Jordana Fraiberg (Harvard University)
1990, Brown University: Champion – Jenny Holleran (Harvard University); Finalist – Berkeley Belknap (Yale University)
1989, University of Pennsylvania: Champion – Demer Holleran (Princeton University); Finalist – Hope MacKay (Princeton University)
1988, Dartmouth College: Champion – Diana Edge (Harvard University); Finalist – Demer Holleran (Princeton University)
1987, Harvard University: Champion – Demer Holleran (Princeton University); Finalist – Diana Edge (Harvard University)
1986, Princeton University: Champion – Demer Holleran (Princeton University); Finalist – Diana Edge (Harvard University)
1985, Williams College: Champion – Mary Hulbert (Harvard University); Finalist – Sophie Porter (Princeton University)
1984, Wesleyan University: Champion – Alicia McConnell (University of Pennsylvania); Finalist – Karen Kelso (University of Pennsylvania)
1983, University of Pennsylvania: Champion – Alicia McConnell (University of Pennsylvania); Finalist – Nina Porter (Trinity College)
1982, Harvard University: Champion – Alicia McConnell (University of Pennsylvania); Finalist – Nina Porter (Trinity College)
1981, Bowdoin College: Champion – Jane Giammattei (Pine Manor College); Finalist – Nina Porter (Trinity College)
1980, Princeton University: Champion – Gail Ramsay (Pennsylvania State University); Finalist – Nancy Gengler (Princeton University)
1979, Wesleyan University: Champion – Gail Ramsay (Pennsylvania State University); Finalist – Nancy Gengler (Princeton University)
1978, Williams College: Champion – Gail Ramsay (Pennsylvania State University); Finalist – Liz Munson (Yale University)
1977, University of Pennsylvania: Champion – Gail Ramsay (Pennsylvania State University); Finalist – Cackie Bostwick (Trinity College)
1976, Dartmouth College: Champion – Nancy Gengler (Princeton University); Finalist – Liz Munson (Yale University)
1975, Harvard University: Champion – Wendy Zaharko (Princeton University); Finalist – Emily Goodfellow (Princeton University)
1974, Princeton University: Champion – Wendy Zaharko (Princeton University); Finalist – Barbara Sands (Dartmouth College)
1973, Wesleyan University: Champion – Lee Howard (Radcliffe College/Harvard University); Finalist – Barbara Sands (Dartmouth College)
1972, Trinity College: Champion – Wendy Zaharko (Princeton University); Finalist – Sally Fields (Princeton University)
1971, University of Pennsylvania: Champion – Perla Hewes (State University of New York at Fredonia); Finalist: Beth Anders (Ursinus College)
1970, University of Pennsylvania: Champion – Beth Anders (Ursinus College)
1969, Vassar College: Champion – Jane Slocum (Smith College); Finalist – Sandy Servans (Wellesley College)
1968, Vassar College: Champion – Katherine Allabough (Vassar College); Finalist – Jane Slocum (Smith College)
1967, Vassar College: Champion – Susan Stephenson (Wheaton College)
1966, Wellesley College: Champion – Susan Stephenson (Wheaton College)
1965, Wellesley College: Champion – Katherine Allabough (Vassar College)

A women’s national intercollegiate individual tournament has been held since 1965, when Vassar’s Katherine Allabough defeated seven other players in a tournament at Wellesley.

Held at the end of the college squash season, the individual tournament features two divisions: an A division, in which the top 16 players in the nation compete for the Ramsay Cup; and four B divisions, where players ranked 17th – 64th compete.

The Ramsay Cup, a silver bowl donated in 1974 by the United States Women’s Intercollegiate Squash Racquets Association (a precursor to the Women’s College Squash Association), is named for Gail Ramsay. As a player at Penn State, Ramsay won four back-to-back individual titles from 1977 to 1980, the first collegiate player – female or male – to do so. Ramsay, who was a two-time member on the U.S. national team, went on to win two United States doubles titles and seven mixed-doubles titles, and was ranked as high as number 2 in U.S. women’s singles. Ramsay worked as the head squash and tennis coach at Williams College for six years before becoming the head women’s squash coach at Princeton in 1994. She has led the Tigers to multiple national titles and has coached individual champions as well. She was inducted into the College Squash Hall of Fame as a player in 1995.

 

Holleran Cup (B Division)

HOLLERAN CUP WINNERS (SCHOOL):

2017, at Dartmouth College: Margaux Losty (Cornell University); Alyssa Mehta (Harvard University); Lakeesha Rarere (Trinity College); and Colette Sultana (Columbia University
2016, Chelsea Piers (CT): Zandra Ho (Stanford University); Jennifer Haley (Trinity College); Tanvi Khanna (Columbia University); and Breanne Flynn (George Washington University)
2015, Princeton University: Champion – Alexandra Toth (Princeton University); Finalist – Natalie Babjukova (Trinity College)
2014, Drexel University/University of Pennsylvania: Champion – Shiyuan Mao (Yale University); Finalist – Leslie Gill (University of Pennsylvannia)
2013, Trinity: Champion – Madeleine Gill (Stanford University); Finalist – Lexi Saunders (Princeton University)
2012, Amherst: Champion – Shihui Mao (Yale University); Finalist – Robyn Hodgson (Trinity College)
2011, Dartmouth College: Champion – Katie Giovinazzo (Princeton University); Finalist – Alexandra Sawin (Princeton University)
2010, Trinity College: Champion – Katherine O’Donnell (Harvard University); Finalist – JoAnn Jee (Trinity College)
2009, Williams College: Champion – Jennifer Coxe (Williams College); Finalist Lexi Van Arkle (Yale University)
2008, United States Naval Academy: Champion – Johanna Snyder (Harvard University); Finalist – Margaret Kent (Princeton University)
2007, University of Pennsylvania: Champion – Kaitlin Sennatt (Princeton University); Finalist – Fernanda Rocha (Trinity College)
2006, Amherst College: Caitlin Russell (University of Pennsylvania); Finalist – Carly Grabowski (Princeton University)
2005, Dartmouth College: Champion – Lauren McCrery (Yale University); Finalist – Kate Rapisarda (Yale University)
2004, St. Lawrence University: Clare Whipple (Williams College)
2003, Trinity College: Champion – Merrill Muckerman (Bowdoin College); Finalist – Ashley Harmeling (Amherst College)

The Holleran Cup is named for Demer Holleran. A four-time First Team All-American, Holleran won individual titles in 1986, 1987, and 1989, competed on Princeton’s 1989 national championship-winning team, and won the 1989 Betty Richey Award, a top honor for women’s college players. As a professional player, Holleran won six hardball U.S. singles titles, six softball individual titles, ten national doubles titles, eight national mixed doubles titles, three world doubles titles, and one world mixed-doubles title. In her nine years as the women’s squash coach at the University of Pennsylvania, Holleran led the Quakers to their first national title and an undefeated season in 2000. After retiring from the University of Pennsylvania in 2001, Holleran founded the Fairmount Athletic Club in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. She was inducted into the U.S. Squash Hall of Fame in 2004 and the College Squash Hall of Fame in 2005.

Beginning with the 2015 – 2016 season, players seeded 17th – 64th are divided into four draws that are evenly distributed by seeding.

Men's

While doubles is not a standard part of dual match play in college squash, an intercollegiate doubles tournament has been held annually since the late 1980s. A doubles tournament was held sporadically in the 1940s and 1950s, but after the 1956 tournament, there was no formal intercollegiate doubles competition for over thirty years.  In 1988, William Tredwell “Treddy” Ketcham helped bring back the doubles tournament. A former player at Yale who served as the USSRA president from 1965 to 1967, Ketcham was a major proponent of the doubles game. He was also an accomplished player; between 1965 and 1974, he won the USSRA senior (age 50+) doubles title seven times, playing with four different partners. The intercollegiate doubles tournament was renamed in his honor in 1998.

NATIONAL INTERCOLLEGIATE DOUBLES CHAMPIONS:

2017: Senen Ubina & Jack Herold (United States Naval Academy)
2016: Jack Herold & Randall Beck (United States Naval Academy)
2015: Senen Ubina & Billy Kacergis (United States Naval Academy)
2014: Neil Cordell & Mario Yanez (University of Rochester)
2013: Hunter Beck & Andrew McGuinness (United States Naval Academy)
2012: Todd Harrity & Taylor Tutrone (Princeton University)
2011: Trevor McGuinness & Tom Mattsson (University of Pennsylvania)
2011: Gabriel de Melo & Ryan Mullaney (Franklin & Marshall)
2010: Trevor McGuinness & Porter Drake (University of Pennsylvania)
2009: Trevor McGuinness & Tom Mattsson (University of Pennsylvania)
2008: David Letourneau & Kimlee Wong (Princeton University)
2007: Zach Linhart & Peter Cipriano (Bowdoin College)
2006: Will Broadbent & Garnett Booth (Harvard University)
2005: Julian Illingworth & Trevor Rees (Yale University)
2004: Pat Malloy & Coly Smith (Trinity College)
2003: Will Osnato & Dent Wilkens (Princeton University)
2002: Dylan Patterson & Peter Carlin (Harvard University)
2001: Duncan Pearson & Patrick Malloy (Trinity College)
2000: Akhil Behl & Duncan Pearson (Trinity College)
1999: Akhil Behl & Duncan Pearson (Trinity College)
1998: Preston Quick & Joseph Pentland (Trinity College)
1997: Jess Berline & Mike Sabatine (Franklin & Marshall)
1996: Ben Fishman & Jack Wyant (Princeton University)
1995: Rick Hartigan & David Kaye (Princeton University)
1994: Jamie Dean & Reade Frank (Yale University)
1993: Jamie Dean & Reade Frank (Yale University)
1992: Garrett Frank & Jamie Dean (Yale University)
1991: Alex Darrow & Garrett Frank (Yale University)
1990: Alex Dean & Alex Darrow (Yale University)
1989: Alex Dean & Erik Wohlgemuth (Yale University)
1988: Keen Butcher & Roy Rubin (Princeton University)
1956: Thomas  Jones & Samuel Eels (Williams College)
1954: Dan Hutchinson & Roland Nordie (United States Military Academy)
1953: Charles Warner & Ben Edwards (Princeton University)
1951: Rick Austin & Steve Foster (Dartmouth College)
1950: R. Allen & R. Dickinson (Williams College)
1948: Kingsley & Seymour Knox (Yale University)
1942: Larry Austin & Sands (Dartmouth College)

Women's

NATIONAL INTERCOLLEGIATE DOUBLES CHAMPIONS:

2017: Lindsay Stanley & Julia Buchholz (University of Pennsylvania)
2016: Maria Elena Ubina & Alexandra Toth (Princeton University)
2015: Maria Elena Ubina & Olivia Fiechter (Princeton University)
2014: Maria Elena Ubina & Olivia Fiechter (Princeton University)
2013: Rachel Leizman & Maria Elena Ubina (Princeton University)
2012: Ashley Tidman & Natalie Babjukova (Trinity College)
2011: Nabilla Ariffin & Pia Trikha (University of Pennsylvania)
2011: Cecelia Cortes & Sarah Mumanachit (Harvard University)

Mixed

NATIONAL MIXED INTERCOLLEGIATE DOUBLES CHAMPIONS:

2017: Sanjay Jeeva & Sherilyn Yang (Franklin & Marshall)
2016: George Lemmon & Jessica Davis (University of Pennsylvania)
2015: George Lemmon & Anaka Alankamony (University of Pennsylvania)
2014: Samuel Kang & Maria Elena Ubina (Princeton University)
2013: Samuel Kang & Maria Elena Ubina (Princeton University)
2012: Daniel Junn & Colleen Fehm (University of Pennsylvania)
2011: Trevor McGuinness & Colleen Fehm (University of Pennsylvania)